Eric Guido's Eggplant Parmigiana

Seriously good comfort food

 


If you were to ask any of my friends or clients about my specialty, they would quickly inform you that it’s risotto. However, it wasn’t always so. Long before my professional career and formal training, I was a cook that depended on what I learned as a child. The rich Italian-American cooking of my family was my strong suit and, more than anything else, it was my grandmother’s Eggplant Parmigiana that was requested over and over again. It’s serious comfort food and one of those dishes that incites applause and smiles all around.

The secret behind this dish is more in the preparation and attention to details than anything else. It starts with the care taken when preparing and dredging the eggplant. The breadcrumbs should be fresh and freshly seasoned by your own hand. Next, the oil should be light olive oil at a medium temperature because extra virgin burns over anything other than a low flame.
Related Imagery
Prepare the eggplant
Mix dry ingredients
Set up a dredging station
Place coated eggplant on a rack
Fry the eggplant
Cover with cheeses and sauce
Neatly stack pieces of eggplant
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And speaking of the flame, the herbs you add to the breadcrumbs will not burn in this recipe (as they do when most people fry) because the flame stays at a consistent medium and the eggplant is only in the pan long enough to slightly brown. I fondly remember my grandmother saying, "No, no, no, you don't cook the eggplant in the oil. You cook it in the oven. The oil is only to brown the bread crumbs." Lastly, the fried eggplant should be dried before being added to the baking dish so that the crust is firm and crisp.

As for wine, a household favorite is Primitivo, which tends to counter the rich and vibrant flavors of the eggplant parm with its own rich and vibrant profile. Keep in mind that, although this is a dish centered around a vegetable, it is still a formidable dish that will hold up to any number of big red wines.

Grandmother’s Eggplant Parmigiana

Serves 5 - 6

2 medium-size eggplants
Salt and pepper to taste
2 cups flour
4 eggs
2 cups fresh breadcrumbs (go to a local bakery for these if not available in your supermarket)
2 tsp dried oregano
2 tsp dried basil
1 tsp garlic granules
1/2 tsp cracked pepper
1/2 tsp salt
Light olive oil (enough for frying; be prepared to change the oil at least once)
8 ounces of Parmigiano Reggiano (grated)
16 ounces of mozzarella (shredded)
6 cups tomato sauce (a simply tomato sauce will do; I like to go for a chunky style with a little basil)

Peel and slice the eggplant. (Each slice should be about 1/8 of an inch.) Lay the slices out on a rack or sheet pan lined with paper towels and sprinkle heavily with salt. Then flip the slices and sprinkle the other side with salt as well. Allow the eggplant to sit like this for one hour. The salt will pull bitter juices out of the eggplant. When one hour has passed, quickly rinse each slice of eggplant under cold water and set out on a towel to dry.

To prepare your dredging station, set up a plate, followed by a bowl, followed by another plate. On the first plate, place your two cups of flour. In the bowl, crack four eggs and whip them to consistency. In a small mixing bowl, pour two cups of breadcrumbs, two tsp dried oregano, two tsp dried basil, one tsp garlic granules, a 1/2 tsp cracked pepper and a 1/2 tsp salt. Mix the contents of the bowl together and pour onto the last plate.

Preheat your oven to 325 F.

To dredge, set up a rack for the breaded eggplant to rest on before being fried. Begin the dredging process by lightly seasoning each piece of eggplant with salt and pepper. Then dip a piece of eggplant into the flour and coat completely. Shake off any loose flour and drop the eggplant slice into the eggs. Then, using a fork, lift the eggplant from the eggs and allow any excess egg to drip off. Now place into the breadcrumbs and coat completely. When coated, move the slice of eggplant to the rack. Do this for all slices of eggplant.

In a pan (I like to use a large cast-iron pan), pour enough light olive oil into the pan to cover the entire bottom with about 1/8 inch of oil. Bring the flame up to medium-low and allow the olive oil to come up in temperature. 

Near your frying oil, set up the following: a plate or sheet pan lined with paper towel; a glass Pyrex, CorningWare or chafing dish for the eggplant, the shredded mozzarella and the grated Parmigiano Reggiano, and the sauce in a pot over a low flame. Ladle a small amount of sauce into the bottom of the dish and spread it out across the entire bottom to create a light layer of sauce.

Begin to fry the eggplant by adding it to the fry oil (do not overcrowd the pan), allow the first side to brown lightly and then flip the eggplant. (Like my grandmother said, the eggplant cooks in the oven.) Once the second side is lightly browned, move the eggplant to a towel to drain. Add more eggplant to the fry oil to continue the process. Once the pieces on the towel are drained of any excess oil, move them to the Pyrex or chafing dish, cover with a large pinch of grated Parmigiano Reggiano, then a large pinch of mozzarella and a small ladle of sauce. Continue this process until all the eggplant has been fried, but remember that you will likely need to change out the oil in your pan at least once during this process. 

The end result should be neatly stacked pieces of eggplant, three to four pieces high, with both cheeses and a small ladle of sauce between each stack. Once you have assembled all stacks, add a generous sprinkle of mozzarella across the top and place in the oven for 45 minutes.

Remove from the oven when done, let cool for 10-15 minutes and then serve family-style.

Meet Chef Eric Guido
After working in the New York City restaurant scene, Eric Guido branched out, organizing private dining and tasting events centered around Italian cuisine and wine. Here he began to incorporate food photography and recipe development.  His continuing work can be seen at www.theviptable.net. Eric’s passion for food and wine is fueled by the togetherness and satisfaction found at the table.


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Comments

  • Snooth User: zinfandel1
    Hand of Snooth
    154660 1,002

    Eric,
    is there any way when picking out egg plant to tell if its loaded with seeds or has a minimal amount of seeds?

    Dec 31, 2010 at 6:21 PM


  • Snooth User: Eric Guido
    Hand of Snooth Voice of Snooth
    92549 165,592

    You want to look for small to medium sized eggplants that show a deep purple skin with a natural sheen to the skin. Basically, young eggplant.

    Also, at the bottom of an eggplant, you'll find a dimple that can be very round or oval in shape. The round ones "female" have more seeds and tend to be less meaty, so select the oval "male" dimpled eggplant.

    To really spice things up, you can use Sicilian eggplants that are very small with a much smaller percentage of seeds. These are also great eggplants to use in a caponata recipe.

    In the end, keep in mind that the salt curing process removes a large amount of the bitterness.

    Dec 31, 2010 at 6:39 PM


  • Snooth User: Jnoahtwo
    514389 1

    Could you please tell us the calorie count in all these recipes you have shared with us, especially Guidos Grandmothers eggplant parmigiana? The recipes sound delicious, but in these days of healthier foods, one must know the calorie count in feeding their families. Thank you. Jnoahtwo@msn.com

    Dec 31, 2010 at 10:40 PM


  • Snooth User: msnfmp
    355447 20

    what to do for diabetic......

    Jan 03, 2011 at 11:56 AM


  • Snooth User: Eric Guido
    Hand of Snooth Voice of Snooth
    92549 165,592

    Jnoahtwo - I'm sorry to say that I've never submitted this for a Calorie analysis. This recipe comes straight from the heart, My Grandmother's to be exact.

    What I will say, is that, due to the amount of fat from frying, cheese and egg, that I would not recommend indulging too heavily in this dish. That said, this isn't something I make very often. It's very much a food for celebration, parties, events. The average person will usually eat a single stack of eggplant and in my estimation. there's nothing unhealthy about that.

    msnfmp - as a diabetic, what would you say are your restrictions? The thing that comes to mind when I hear diabetic, is sugar, of which there is very little of in this dish. Give me more detail and I'll be happy to give you a better answer.

    Jan 03, 2011 at 7:39 PM


  • Snooth User: Eric Guido
    Hand of Snooth Voice of Snooth
    92549 165,592

    Jnoahtwo - I'm sorry to say that I've never submitted this for a Calorie analysis. This recipe comes straight from the heart, My Grandmother's to be exact. What I will say, is that, due to the amount of fat from frying, cheese and egg, that I would not recommend indulging too heavily in this dish. That said, this isn't something I make very often. It's very much a food for celebration, parties, events. The average person will usually eat a single stack of eggplant and in my estimation. there's nothing unhealthy about that.

    msnfmp - as a diabetic, what would you say are your restrictions? The thing that comes to mind when I hear diabetic, is sugar, of which there is very little of in this dish. Give me more detail and I'll be happy to give you a better answer."

    Jan 03, 2011 at 10:20 PM


  • Snooth User: Howdababy
    454207 1

    Eric,
    Is the referenced slicing thickness of 1/8th inch correct? Seems awfully thin

    Jan 04, 2011 at 9:40 AM


  • Snooth User: Eric Guido
    Hand of Snooth Voice of Snooth
    92549 165,592

    1/8th is not a typo. You could absolutely go thicker but if you look at a ruler for 1/8th and then consider the dredging process, which will add width as well, you have the average slice of eggplant parm.

    Also, by going thicker, you risk some people feeling that there's too much eggplant flavor, which turns some people off. I love eggplant, so I wouldn't mind it but I've met a lot of people that aren't big fans of eggplant, yet those same people love this dish.

    In the end, don't worry too much, if you feel more comfortable with a thicker slice, then give it a try and see if you like the flavor.

    Jan 07, 2011 at 5:55 AM


  • Snooth User: Fatfrank
    562694 2

    Great recipe and advice!. As we are semi vegan's (ie. less than 10% animal protein) we adapted your recipe with great success. We eliminated the eggs and breadcrumbs, added the spice to the flour, dredged the cut eggplant pieces in the flour only and fried lightly in a small amount of oil. Added the real Reggiano but used a substitute soy mozzarella cheese. The result was delicious and very calorie wise. Thanks again.

    Jan 09, 2011 at 9:33 AM


  • Snooth User: beanfair
    189156 1

    I am allergic to egg yolks and I am having a terrible time finding a good substitute when it comes to dredging with bread crumbs. The fake eggs or egg whites alone just don't hold the bread crumbs sufficiently. Any suggestions?
    I want to cook the favorites for the Italians in my life but they just don't let themselves enjoy if I can't eat it as well. So we put a smile on our faces as the bread crumb coatings slide off or go MIA.

    Jan 13, 2011 at 6:59 AM


  • Snooth User: moesyzlak
    745915 1

    Does rinsing the eggplant after salting end up adding more unwanted water in the eggplants?

    -Moe

    Jan 26, 2011 at 3:56 PM


  • Snooth User: Eric Guido
    Hand of Snooth Voice of Snooth
    92549 165,592

    The rinse I give these is extremely fast and the pieces are moved right to a towel. My biggest fear with the curing process is that the salt makes the dish salty but I've never noticed any loss of flavor or extra moisture from a quick rinse.

    Jan 27, 2011 at 12:00 AM


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