Grilling Guide: Beef

The art and craft of grilling, and pairing for, beef’s carnivorous bounty


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Grilling Guide: Beef Beef is the granddaddy of grilling. Not only is grilling a traditional way to cook beef, but there’s also so much more to beef than, say, chicken. After all, when I say “beef,” you might be thinking of your favorite strip steak—but really, beef refers to such a diversity of cuts that it can only be thought of as a big, glorious umbrella of carnivorous variety.

When grilling beef, you need to carefully consider the cut of meat before deciding on a recipe. Some cuts, strip steak and rib-eye for example, are virtually interchangeable; but others, brisket, filet mignon and beef ribs for example, need very specific handling. You don’t want to over-marinate or over-cook your filet (or undercook your ribs or brisket, for that matter).

But it’s not just picking your meat. Cooking techniques and seasonings all need to be carefully considered when it comes to grilling beef. All of those elements also come into play when considering not only your final product, but what wine to pair with it. So let’s take a look at some classic grilled beef preparations, along with the whys, hows, and whats of pairing wine with them.

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Comments

  • This article about grilling meat, is very interesting, but as many can know in my country Argentina the art to cook meat over a fire is one of our traditions, but the diference with the one you have shown is the type of meat, we have other cuts from veal or pork, even lamb, and also the level of cooking of the meat, here we used to eat overcooked, when in the States or Europe, you can have it as you like, even blue or raw.
    One of the most important issues of grilling is the tipe fuels you can use, charcoal, diferent woods, gas or electricity, in this country the best grill are made with woods like Quebracho our own material.
    As a cook I like well done style my meat, even when I have to grill some meat for others I have to over cooked it because my customers will complain, this type of cooking you describe, its not common here but it´s becoming to establish in some restuarants, mostly in Buenos Aires.

    Jun 21, 2013 at 11:57 AM


  • Disappointing article that talks about issues but really gives no recipes or actual grilling techniques for each of the cuts.

    Jun 21, 2013 at 4:24 PM


  • Snooth User: art1047
    1192363 21

    I found your article very informative. The web page gives the following: Wine & Food, Recipe Pairing Guides, Recipe Finder, & other useful Articles. Keep up the good work as I will continue to support your efforts.

    Jun 23, 2013 at 1:36 PM


  • Snooth User: tasnady
    1007475 15

    DEAR SIRS,

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    MARGARET TASNADY CHAMBERS

    Jun 23, 2013 at 3:59 PM


  • Snooth User: spicycurry
    764650 53

    Grilled short ribs? Nah. That's gonna suck. That's a braising cut. After checking the recipe, there is no way that's going to be edible. I don't care what epicurious says. They're (and by association, you at Snooth) are sending everyone over the cliff on this one. It's going to be some tough, chewy and unpleasant stuff.

    Jun 28, 2013 at 7:52 PM


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