What We've Been Reading

Cookin in Sens

 


Alright, call me biased, but once I see any blog with a connection to France (and especially a food blog), I swoon.

This week's featured blog, Cooking in Sens, is in a sense an ode to living in many places at once. Our author is "an American, born in Texas, raised in California" who has lived internationally for the last 30 years and is now settled in both upstate New York and Sens, France. What a great stage for a food blog that celebrates the culinary delights from the international corners of the world.

I loved reading the story behind the Haitian Griot, a perfect mid-winter weeknight meal, while the Salmon with Saffron Sauce and Fettucine left me speechless. If you want to prepare a traditional Burgundian meal (and at the same time get a little adventurous with your palette) be sure to check out the Balsamic Glazed Calf's Liver with Brussel Sprouts.
One of my favorite culinary memories from France is the homemade Aubergines dish my host mother prepared for me. There can be no question as to why I was immediately salivating (and reminiscing) while scrolling through the post on Grilled Aubergines a la Velours de Balsamique.

Hitting even close to home is the delicious looking New York Style Pizza! And on a completely different note, do not miss the Romanesco Tarte with Bacon which features a unique and eye-pleasing rendition of broccoli.

And to leave you on a sweet note, the Jade's Strawberry Tart is an absolute delicacy.

So do yourself a favor and visit Cooking in Sens today. Be sure to let us know your favorite recipes and posts below!

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Comments

  • Snooth User: Lamebear
    701439 22

    If you were "left speechless" by the salmon with saffron and fettuccine recipe you published it was probably because your fish was so dry you couldn't swallow. To sauté a salmon fillet for eight minutes is to turn it to cardboard. And what, pray tell, is the "wagamama method"? "Wagamama" is the name of a chain of noodle shops; there is no such thing as a wagamama method for cooking fish ... or even noodles, so far as I know. (Google's search engine never heard of it either.)

    Serious cooks take note: cook your salmon the way you always cook your salmon, so it's moist & flaky, barely done on the inside. Unless you like fish-flavored cardboard.

    Feb 18, 2012 at 10:23 PM


  • Snooth User: Witkacy
    244937 0

    From my limited experience and to my taste - fish is usually overcooked in the Central and Eastern Europe. Otherwise, recipe looks great.

    Feb 19, 2012 at 12:00 AM


  • Snooth User: Witkacy
    244937 0

    From my limited experience and to my taste - fish is usually overcooked in the Central and Eastern Europe. Otherwise, recipe looks great.

    Feb 19, 2012 at 12:00 AM


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